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A paint palette

The gib-stopping of our shed flat is done. Some is satisfactory, some I’ll forever look at in horror and some (the ceiling) I am pleased I can say, “M did that!” Now to paint, and hope a layer of colour might hide a multitude of sins.

Gib-stopping done, now for the paint! Judy reports on prgress from the shed.

Photo notes: badly gib-stopped ceiling; roof-red wall; yellow doors; stealth bomber-style tiled floor; dirt-concealing carpet

The gib-stopping of our shed flat is done. Some is satisfactory, some I’ll forever look at in horror and some (the ceiling) I am pleased I can say, “M did that!” Now to paint, and hope a layer of colour might hide a multitude of sins.

We had an assortment of left-over paint stored in the shed (seems we have an assortment of many left-overs stored in the shed) and, as you may have already noted, I’m into recycling. So, once again, I decide to put these oddments to use (and save a few dollars as well).

“Lime green… that’ll be nice in our bedroom. And, Mum, how about a pale forest green in your room? A blue bathroom and toilet may be cool but pale yellow on the doors and in the hallway will add some warmth. Okay?”

Agreed upon without question, I called in reinforcements and friends and family took up tools. Within a couple of weeks our little flat was looking like a little home.

The kitchen-living area needed a little more thought. Recent homes we’d built had been painted throughout in  popular nondescript pale browns, so we had sufficient part-pails of these to combine and make a very acceptable ‘mushroom’.  And I had this strange desire to make one wall a feature wall—a deep red. Not a problem, we haven’t spent any money on paint at this stage, one four-litre pail won’t cost much.  Wrong! One four-litre pail of deep red paint costs $150+. Ouch!

To the rescue comes nice Mr Mitre 10 Mega.  “It’s only a shed, isn’t it?” (Must be infectious!)  “Why don’t you use roof paint? It’s near enough to the red you want and only costs $80 for ten litres.”

As it turned out the red is the perfect shade and we now have about six litres of red roof paint sitting in the shed for another time.

Now for the last task before we can inhabit our new dwelling: lay some carpet. For once, this was an easy choice: cheap but reasonably hard-wearing, and the colour of dirt so dirt from boots worn inside (not something to be encouraged, but I am realistic!) won’t be seen. 

Curtains were hung in Mother’s room and big clean-up took place within the shed. Time for the big move. Beds are in place; computer, TV, DVD connected; washing machine, oven & fridge installed; and we’re ready to move in.  Jim and I step over our clothes ‘hanging’ on the floor to find our bed …

“Jim, I can’t cope with this. I urgently need a clothes rack.”

Not a problem to builder Jim. We have a spare wire rack from some wardrobe that will do wonderfully—though, I must admit Jim was dubious. He obediently hung the rack along a bedroom wall; I hung the clothes on the rack, neat and orderly.  Lovely, I thought, as I went to put the jug on …

Ker-thunk!

Back-track to the bedroom, and guess what’s on the floor again?  “Jiiimm …”

The following day I had a solid bar attached firmly to the wall with solid wooden brackets and the bonus of a shelf on top—and our bedroom is just one big walk-in wardrobe!

While this internal work was going on so was there activity on the land. More on that next time!

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