fbpx

Good’s curly-haired editor puts the ghd Max styler to the test

Hair confessions with Good editor Carolyn Enting.

As a naturally curly-haired gal it is fair to say I’ve had my fair share of hair mares as I’ve learned how to best wear my hair over the years.

My beautiful Mum had mostly straight hair. She insisted on using a hairdryer so she wouldn’t catch a chill, and brushed her hair daily, so she got me doing the same. Only issue with my hair type is it resulted in looking like a broom head.

One boy at school even told me my hair could be used to sweep a chimney which was a mortifying moment for an 11-year-old!

As a teen my hairdresser introduced me to mousse and blow-drying my hair with a diffuser attachment to create great curls. I actually thought I needed this tool to get good curls and did this religiously.

Later, another hairdresser taught me a trick of finger-curling my hair when it was wet and letting it dry naturally, which resulted in long bouncy ringlets.

Over the years almost every hairdresser has commented that I have a lot of hair and have mostly been slightly terrified of it. So, when ghd first hit the market, I was one of the first adopters, because I still really hadn’t mastered my hair.

Ironically I’ve learned that all I need to do is just comb my hair after washing it and let it dry naturally and amazingly, the curls are there – no finger curling or diffusers required. It is embarrassing to admit after all the angst and “advice” that it is really that easy.

And I’ve learned to love my curls and this is how I wear my hair the majority of the time. And from time-to-time I still enjoy straightening it too, especially for special occasions.

The effect is transformative, because it is a change, and just like putting on a dress that is new to you (new or second-hand) I find it puts an extra spring in my step.

Often people don’t even recognise me with straight hair, and I feel more glamorous even. And an added benefit of straight hair is I don’t have to wash it every day like I do for curl control.

I realise I’m super lucky to be able to wear it both ways, but back to my confession…

I own three sets of ghds already (including the model launched in 2007 with wider than usual plates) and rate them highly – so when I was offered to trial the new ghd Max styler I did wonder how on earth they could improve the result or experience.

And, as the editor of a conscious-living magazine, the last thing I need is another pair.

However, if I were to lose my sets of ghds I would most definitely invest in the ghd Max for the following reasons:

Time saver – I shaved 10 minutes off the usual time for straightening my hair. The reason for this is that the irons can handle bigger sections of hair, so you can be less fastidious about sectioning. It usually takes me 25 minutes to straighten my hair. Using the ghd Max took this down to 15 minutes.

Good editor Carolyn Enting's rushed first try using the ghd Max styler which also cut 10 minutes off her usual styling time.

Great for curly hair – One reason for this is because the plates are wider (70% larger than regular plates). And unlike the 2007 model the irons themselves are not as long in length/or don’t appear to be, which makes them easier to hold, manoeuvre and get closer to the scalp. It could be the new curved design that makes them comfortable to hold.

New technology – The ghd Max styler has advanced dual-zone ceramic technology, which constantly monitors the optimum styling temperature at 185 degrees Celsius across both plates. And this helps to cut down on styling time while also giving the appearance of less frizz and more shine.

Conclusion: I didn’t think I would ever want another pair of ghds but these are actually really great for long, thick or curly hair. Hmmm!

The new ghd Max styler is great for long, thick and curly hair.
Share the love
Rate This Article:
Previous Article
Next Article
Processing...
Thank you! Your subscription has been confirmed. You'll hear from us soon.
Sign up to our email newsletters for your weekly dose of good
ErrorHere